How to Fix Healthcare

Republicans are racing to meet a self-imposed deadline of passing “healthcare reform” before Congress heads into its July recess.

Pardon me if that doesn’t sound like sheer stupidity-ish. Here’s why.

Per the U.S. Constitution, healthcare is not a responsibility of the federal government. No. It’s. Not. Cuz I’ve read that puppy a few times. All the way through. Trust me. Healthcare isn’t in there. 

So if you want to “fix” or “reform” health care, job one is get the feds out of it. Period. That’s why I don’t support “repeal and replace,” but repeal. Besides. A federal one-size-fits-all inevitably results in two things right off the bat: 1) Costs go through the roof; 2) Quality goes through the floor. 

Savvy?

So let health care decisions be made closer to the people who are directly  effected by them. Like the states. 10th Amendment. Hello?

Speaking of which, here’s an idea: With Theftisas playing scare-the-tail-off-the-donkey, just steal their thunder by block granting Medicaid to the individual states.

Other idea: Let the individual consumer, not government bureurcrats, decide what kind of policy s/he wants and needs, and purchase accordingly on the open market. A la carte. 

Indeed, one of the most onerous parts of Obamacare is forcing healthy young people to pay through the nose to subsidize older, less healthy consumers. Not surprisingly, a lot of young people don’t appreciate having having their pockets picked by the feds and aren’t playing. For them, it’s cheaper to pay the penalty. Or be able to pick and choose the type of coverage they need and can afford.

Next, get rid of the individual mandate. Leave that up to the consumer. See above. (Funny how the party of “choice” doesn’t want you to have any when it comes to healthcare. Or schools. Firearms. Union membership….)

That’s for starters.

By the way, the GOP has it backwards when it comes to rolling out health care reform. (Like that’s never happened before, right?) Republicans should be focused on getting tax reform/cuts and infrastructure bills through first, followed by healthcare. Way it is now, with the process/priorities reversed, they’re looking at a rather rickety house of cards.

Oopsie.

Exit questions Republicans should be asking:

  1. What’s the end game with “healthcare repeal”?
  2. What do we want to accomplish?
  3. What’s our message?

I’d pontificate further, but I have a lunch date. And I’m never late for tiramisu. So what would you add?

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